人権デーに寄せる国連合同エイズ計画(UNAIDS)事務局長メッセージ

(解説)12月1日の世界エイズデーに続いて、12月10日は人権デーです。国連合同エイズ計画(UNAIDS)のウィニー・ビヤニマ事務局長が人権デーに寄せるプレス声明を発表しました。その日本語仮訳です。

人権デーに寄せる国連合同エイズ計画(UNAIDS)事務局長メッセージ
 2019年12月10日 プレス声明
https://www.unaids.org/en/resources/presscentre/pressreleaseandstatementarchive/2019/december/20191210_human-rights-day


 人権はエイズ終結の鍵であり、エイズの流行開始以来、続いている闘いとその成果の中心でもあります。
 私たちが人権を求めてこなければ、そして人権がエイズ対策の核心であることをたえず訴え続けてこなければ、2400万もの人が治療を受けられるようにはならなかったし、HIV陽性者の5人に4人が自らの感染を知っているという状態にもならなかったでしょう。そして、社会的に弱い立場に置かれ、排除されがちな集団およびHIV陽性者が、スティグマに妨げられることなく保健医療へのアクセスを確保することを政府に責任をもって迫る力も得られなかったでしょう。
 それでもなお、エイズへの対応は終わったわけではありません。人権を妨げる障壁は残っています。HIVは依然として、不平等とスティグマ、差別、暴力による流行なのです。人権が侵害されれば、感染のリスクは高まり、HIV検査も治療も受けられません。
 世界の新規感染の54%はキーポピュレーションの人たちで占められています。サハラ以南のアフリカを除けば、75%です。2018年には世界全体で毎週6000人の思春期の少女と若い女性がHIVに感染しています。はっきりさせておきましょう。これらのコミュニティはあらかじめ取り残されていたわけではなく、すでに存在し、新たに制定されもする法律や政策、およびその執行により、取り残された状態に追い込まれていくのです。
 様々な差別や不平等のために、女性やキーポピュレーションは特異な脆弱性や障壁を経験しています。たとえば、薬物を使用している女性は、投獄される割合が極端に高く、HIV感染のリスクも男性の薬物使用者より高くなっています。
 セックスワーカー、ゲイ男性など男性とセックスをする男性、トランスジェンダーの人たち、薬物使用者には、刑法による過酷かつ容赦のない壁が立ちはだかっています。法律がスティグマと差別を広げ、ハームリダクションやHIV検査、治療、予防のサービスを受けることを妨げています。コミュニティが連絡を取り合い、助け合うこともできなくなります。コミュニティを孤立に追い込み、社会から見えにくくし、暴力被害を広げるのです。
 こうした法律は人びととコミュニティが平等かつ健康的な生活を送ることを妨げ、プライバシーと家族を守る権利を侵害し、生命にすら影響を及ぼしています。
 しかし、私たちは少しずつ、この状態を覆してきました。セックスワークの非犯罪化により、過去10年でセックスワーカーとそのパートナーの新規HIV感染は33%から44%、減少しています。サハラ以南のアフリカの新たなエビデンスによると、レズビアン、ゲイ、バイセクシュアル、トランスジェンダー、インターセックスの人たちに支援的な法律がある国では、HIVに感染したゲイ男性など男性とセックスをする男性の間で自らのHIV感染を知っている人の割合が他の国々より3倍も高くなっています。また、薬物使用を非犯罪化し、ハームリダクションを提供している国では、薬物使用者のHIV感染が急減しています。
 もはやエビデンスがあるかどうかという話ではありません。必要なのはリーダーシップと政治的な決断と行動なのです。
 人権に関し、各国が真っ先に担うべき責務は「尊重」です。人権を侵害するのではなく、尊重することです。差別的な刑法を残したままでは、この最初のハードルを越えることはできません。
 法律は最も弱い立場に置かれ、支援を必要とする人たちを守るためにあります。迫害するためではありません。公衆衛生と人権を守る努力を妨害するためではないのです。



PRESS STATEMENT
UNAIDS Executive Director's message on the occasion of Human Rights Day
10 December 2019

Human rights are key to ending AIDS and have been at the heart of every struggle and every success we have had since the beginning of the epidemic. 
Without us demanding our human rights and the tireless call to ensure that human rights remain central to the AIDS response, we would not have more than 24 million people on treatment today and four in five people living with HIV would not know their HIV status. Vulnerable and marginalized populations and people living with HIV would not have access to stigma-free health care or the ability to hold governments to account.
Yet the AIDS response is not over, and barriers to human rights remain. HIV is still an epidemic of inequality, stigma, discrimination and violence. Where people’s rights are breached, they are at higher risk of infection and are less likely to take an HIV test or to be on treatment.
Key populations now account for 54% of new infections globally―75% of new infections outside of sub-Saharan Africa. Globally, in 2018, 6000 adolescent girls and young women became infected with HIV every week. Let me be clear, these communities are not being left behind―they are being pushed behind, by laws, policies and practices that are created, enacted and implemented.
Intersecting forms of discrimination and inequality push women in key populations to experience unique vulnerabilities and barriers. We know, for example, that women who use drugs are disproportionately incarcerated and are at higher risk of HIV than their male counterparts.
Sex workers, gay men and other men who have sex with men, transgender people and people who use drugs face harsh and unforgiving barriers in the form of criminal laws. These laws increase stigma and discrimination and stop people accessing harm reduction and HIV testing, treatment and prevention services. They prevent communities from coordinating and working together, they isolate and render communities invisible and they increase levels of violence.
These laws affect lives and the rights of people and communities to equality, health, privacy, family and even life itself.
But, in a stroke of the pen we could reverse this. Decriminalization of sex work could reduce between 33% and 46% of new HIV infections among sex workers and their partners over 10 years. New evidence in sub-Saharan Africa has shown that knowledge of HIV status among gay men and other men who have sex with men who were living with HIV was three times higher in countries with more supportive laws for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people, and countries that decriminalize drug use and provide harm reduction see HIV infections plummet among people who use drugs.
This is no longer about a need for evidence―it’s about leadership, political courage and action.
The first obligation of a country for its human rights is “respect”―the obligation to respect, not breach, people’s human rights. By keeping such criminal laws in place, we are failing at the first hurdle.
The law should protect, not persecute, the most vulnerable and must support, not sabotage, public health and human rights efforts.

ブログ気持玉

クリックして気持ちを伝えよう!

ログインしてクリックすれば、自分のブログへのリンクが付きます。

→ログインへ

なるほど(納得、参考になった、ヘー)
驚いた
面白い
ナイス
ガッツ(がんばれ!)
かわいい

気持玉数 : 0

この記事へのコメント